The Sales Roundup, GoDaddy’s July Sales, Part 2: Why SuperCoins.com Sold for $75,000, and More

In part 1 of the July GoDaddy special of the Sales Roundup, I looked at 5 sales that GoDaddy recently reported from July 2020. Those sales included Fanbase.com for $151,000, ZCG.com for $140,000, and Wallpapers.com for $129,500.

In this 2nd part of the Sales Roundup special, I’m looking at 5 more sales from GoDaddy to see why they sold for the prices that they did, and what they’re now being used for.

 

SuperCoins.com – $75,000

If you look back at previous “coin” domain sales, you might come to the conclusion that $75,000 for SuperCoins.com is a reasonable sales price. In the past, names such as YouCoin.com, YCoin.com, and GlobalCoin.com have sold for five-figure fees.

However, on the surface, SuperCoins.com (with the “s” plural) seems to suggest that the name was acquired for something more specific than a general cryptocurrency-related acquisition.

The SuperCoins.com domain, as it turns out, was acquired by Flipkart for its SuperCoin initiative. The Indian e-commerce marketplace has raised $9 billion in funding since it was founded in 2007.

SuperCoins are used by Flipkart as a loyalty scheme. The more you buy on Flipkart, the more SuperCoins you get to spend on specific deals at Flipkart.

As of writing, SuperCoins.com is not being used by Flipkart, but eventually, the name is likely to forward to Flipkart’s SuperCoins subpage. SuperCoins.com was likely a defensive purchase for the company’s key loyalty incentive.

 

GOFX.com – $57,500

FX is the common acronym for Forex, also known as the Foreign Exchange Market. FX can be a lucrative acronym within domains.

FXT.com ($150,000), AIFX.com ($50,700), and FXGO.com ($48,000) are all examples of previous FX sales, so the $57,500 price tag for GOFX.com fits nicely into this valuation scale.

The GOFX.com domain was acquired by a Thai company called GOFX, and it looks to have been an upgrade from GOFX.co.th, the Thai ccTLD.

 

Anika.com – $55,000

Aside from being a female first name, Anika is also the name of a therapeutics company that specializes in joint preservation. Traded on the NASDAQ since 1993, Anika Therapeutics has certainly taken its time to acquire Anika.com.

Despite Anika.com being registered in 1998, 5 years after Anika’s IPO, the company has taken a further 22 years to acquire the name.

There are no real clues as to why Anika Therapeutics took this long to acquire Anika.com, or what prompted the company to finally part with $55,000 to get the name.

However, it shouldn’t come as a shock to see that Anika Therapeutics was happy to digitally-exist on AnikaTherapeutics.com for so long. In general therapeutic companies tend not to pay too much attention to the domain name that they use.

 

BadBreath.com – $50,000

Bad breath is a common complaint. According to Medical News Today, bad breath is estimated to affect 1 in 4 people globally. Spyfu suggests that there are 22,000 Google searches for “bad breath” every month in the US alone.

It’s logical, then, if a company providing oral care products acquires BadBreath.com. That’s exactly what happened. TheraBreath, according to its website, is one of the 5 largest oral care companies in the US and the biggest privately held oral care manufacturer in America.

Developing BadBreath.com into its own entity would ultimately take advantage of the tens of thousands of Google searches per month for people looking for remedies for bad breath.

That, though, is not what TheraBreath has done. Curiously, the company has opted to forward BadBreath.com to its Amazon shop. Is TheraBreath trying to take advantage of type-in traffic to sell more products on its Amazon page?

From minimal data available regarding BadBreath.com’s type-in traffic, I’d suggest that the traffic the name receives naturally is minimal. In my view, it would be more effective for TheraBreath to create a standalone website and invest money into the development of a site and content to take advantage of Google searches for “bad breath.”

 

KaoWang.com – $50,000

考网, pronounced as kǎo wǎng, literally translates from Chinese to English as “test net, ” according to Google Translate. The exact-match domain, KaoWang.com, sold for $50,000. Why?

As of writing, KaoWang.com redirects to 51test.net, a service helping a wide array of people to improve their test scores. Whether that’s school tests or professional exams. The site is reportedly visited by more than 30 million users every month, although SimilarWeb estimates 4.5 million visits to 51test.net every month.

I think that the acquisition of KaoWang.com by 51test.net is part of a rebranding from 51test.net to KaoWang.com. The KaoWang.com name may redirect to 51test.net at the moment, but the company’s logo has been updated to show KaoWang.com within the logo. Earlier this year, the domain displayed was 51test.net.

Expect to see 51test.net rebrand fully as KaoWang.com at some point.

 

 

 

 

About James Iles

James Iles is a domain name industry writer and publisher of JamesNames.com. You can contact me here, or follow me on Twitter @jamesiles.

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